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By Nick Parsons

Aussie wages and employment data this week


Australian Dollar

AUD

Expected Range

The Aussie Dollar ended last week pretty much where it began against a USD which lost quite a bit of ground late Thursday and into Friday. The AUD/USD pair opened last Monday in Sydney at 0.7650 and in one of the quietest weeks in recent memory remained stuck in a range of less than 60 pips from 0.7636 to 0.7694 before ending at USD0.7659.<br> <br> This calm came despite the much-anticipated RBA meeting and the new Quarterly Statement of Monetary Policy; neither of which really shifted the dial much on interest rate expectations. Against this background, a new monthly round of incoming economic begins for the RBA to then consider at their last meeting of the year on Tuesday December 5th.This kicks off with the NAB Business Survey tomorrow, then Wednesday it’s the quarterly wage price index and Thursday it’s the employment and unemployment numbers.<br> <br> Like most Central Banks around the world, the RBA has been a bit puzzled as to why falling joblessness hasn’t so far boosted earnings growth. And, like all the others, it just says “give it time, it will happen”. Interest rates in Australia aren’t going to move much, if at all, until wages actually do pick up, and it looks like being a quiet start to the week for the AUD, with a Guy Debelle speech on business investment the local highlight today.

British Pound

GBP / AUD

Expected Range

Last week was a roller-coaster for the British Pound. GBP/USD began last Monday at 1.3076 and having been as high as 1.3220 after Friday’s economic data, ended the week at 1.3190. Against the Aussie Dollar, GBP rose from 1.7087 to 1.7220 whilst against the Kiwi Dollar it gained exactly one cent from 1.8927 to 1.9027. <br> <br> The weekend Press in the UK has once again been dominated by politics; a constant stream of bad news for Prime Minister Theresa May’s minority government which remains in office (though arguably not in power) only because of a coalition agreement with the Ulster Unionists.<br> <br> The arcane rules of a leadership challenge in the Conservative Party require 48 of their MP’s to sign a letter of no-confidence. Reports on Sunday suggested there were now 40 such signatories and the number could rise as the EU withdrawal bill returns to the House of Commons on Tuesday. It is widely expected the Labour Opposition will join Conservative rebels to inflict a series of potentially damaging defeats on the government.<br> <br> As we saw last week, however, bad political news was to some extent offset by incoming economic data. This week brings UK inflation and unemployment data. CPI is likely to rise above the Bank of England’s 1-3% target range and BoE Governor Carney will have to write a letter to the Chancellor explaining what he will do to bring it down. Spoiler alert: he has already raised UK interest rates! As in Australia, the British Pound is unlikely to rally much unless wages show signs of picking up.

Canadian Dollar

AUD / CAD

Expected Range

The Canadian Dollar has had a very good November so far. It hasn’t been a one-way trade because of the volatility of incoming economic data but it has thus far been the strongest of all the major currencies. It began last Monday in Sydney at USD1.2763 and after a bit of a wobble Tuesday which saw the pair back up from 1.2702 to 1.2797, it was then a steady grind lower to end the week at 1.2689. The Aussie-CAD cross fell from 0.9765 to 0.9720 whilst the Kiwi-CAD fell a little bit less from 0.8715 to 0.8700.<br> <br> As with the Eurozone and the United States, perhaps the most important economic data in Canada this week is CPI, though the annual rate is expected to ease back a touch from 1.6% to just 1.4%. Before then, there’s a few statistics on house prices to digest. September’s -0.8% m/m decline was the biggest monthly drop nationwide since 2010 whilst prices in Toronto tumbled -2.7% m/m (who said monetary policy doesn’t work very quickly?). The Bank of Canada, like its US counterpart, only has 8 monetary policy meetings per year and the next one isn’t scheduled until December 6th.

Euro

AUD / EUR

Expected Range

The EUR opened last Monday morning around 1.1615 and dipped down to a low of 1.1561 just before Tuesday’s US open. From that point it climbed slowly but steadily to a high of USD.1166 before ending week at 1.6662. The AUD/EUR cross rate began at 0.6585 and touched a high of 0.6625 on Thursday before ending Friday on its low at 0.6565. NZD/EUR, meantime, finished the week exactly unchanged at 0.5944.<br> <br> For the week ahead, Eurozone CPI on Thursday will likely be the most important of the economic numbers to be released. With Continental Europe now enjoying its 17th consecutive quarter of GDP growth, subdued price prices are the only reason the ECB continues its policy of Quantitative Easing; albeit now at a somewhat slower monthly pace.<br> <br> Provisional estimates for October showed prices rose just 0.1% on the month for a 1.4% annual inflation rate though with oil prices rising and already feeding into higher pump prices for petrol and diesel, it may not be long before CPI resumes its upward path. As we keep saying, these are the key driver (pun very much intended!) of inflation right across the G20 and the Emerging Markets universe, though the EUR exchange rate this week is more likely to be driven by sentiment towards the USD Dollar.

New Zealand Dollar

AUD / NZD

Expected Range

The Kiwi Dollar had a slightly better week than its Aussie counterpart but still only managed to gain around 50 pips against a generally weak US Dollar. The pair opened in Wellington last Monday morning at 0.6907 and closed in New York on Friday evening at 0.6931.<br> <br> The overall range was somewhat higher than for AUD with 88 pips separating the high of USD0.6972 and the low of USD0.6884. After a minor earthquake measuring 4.8 on the Richter scale was felt in Wellington overnight – almost exactly a year to the day since the destructive 7.8 Kaikoura quake – the New Zealand Dollar opens little changed this Monday morning.<br> <br> Economic data this week is very much second or even third-tier but it does include possibly one of the best indicators of construction activity: ready mixed concrete production. It’s always nice to find that a nation whose official statisticians can’t measure CPI each month can still produce this gem of a number! For today the REINZ releases house sales data but as in Australia, it looks a quiet start to the week across the Tasman Sea with the AUD/NZD cross rate (which closed Friday at 1.1048) perhaps the best guide to Kiwi sentiment.

United States Dollar

AUD / USD

Expected Range

The US Dollar performed very poorly last week. In the first 3 ½ days of the week, the USD index against a basket of currencies was essentially stuck in a range from 96.40-96.84. By Thursday afternoon in New York, however, the mood turned more negative, the S+P 500 index had its worst session in 3 months and the USD index then slid all day Friday to end the week at 94.10; its lowest close since October 26th.<br> <br> The chief reason for the US Dollar’s drop was nervousness about the likely success – or otherwise – of President Trump’s tax reform bill. This formed a central plank of his campaign pledge to “Make America Great Again” but was delayed so much that the hopes of USD bulls were consistently dashed through the first 10 months of his term of office.<br> <br> From November 9th 2016 to the beginning of January, the USD Index surged from 96.6 to 103.3 on hopes for a substantial fiscal boost, faster economic growth and much tighter monetary policy. By late September, the USD Index had tumbled to just 90.9 and if tax reform runs into the ground now, this will again become the downside target. Some support ahead of that comes from the 200 day moving average at 93.25.

By Nick Parsons

USD sharply lower, RBA SoMP awaited


Australian Dollar

AUD

Expected Range

With little fresh news domestically, and helped to a great extent by a much weaker USD (see below) the Australian Dollar initially found some support Thursday from higher than expected inflation figures in China which helped alleviate fears about a further slowdown in the economy which is still the major destination for Australia’s exports of coal, gas and minerals.<br> <br> After a deflation scare around the beginning of the year, China’s CPI had risen to 1.6% y/y in September. October was expected at 1.8% but the actual number printed on Thursday was 1.9%. It is sometimes a little odd to see investors cheering higher inflation and we wouldn’t want to exaggerate the positive impact of the China data on the Aussie Dollar. <br> <br> Yes, the AUD/USD pair reached a high of 0.7692 in London but was then sold heavily down to 0.7652 just after the NY open before recovering to 0.7677. Indeed, if we look at Thursday as a whole, the AUD lost ground to both the Canadian and New Zealand Dollars as well as to the EUR. <br> <br> For the day ahead, the RBA’s Quarterly Statement of Monetary Policy will be the key event for currency traders locally. If AUD/USD manages to get back on to a US 77 cents ‘big figure’ it’s more likely to be because of events in the United States than in Australia. Keep an eye on the AUD crosses for a truer picture post-RBA.

British Pound

GBP / AUD

Expected Range

It was reported on the front page of The Times newspaper on Thursday that, “European Union leaders are preparing for the fall of Theresa May before the new year… Fears are growing in Brussels that the instability of Mrs May’s government raises the real prospect of a change of leadership or elections leading to a Labour victory.” <br> <br> One European leader told the newspaper that, “Britain is very weak and the weakness of Theresa May makes [Brexit] negotiations very difficult.” The appointment of a female pro-Brexit supporter to fill the latest vacant post has allowed the Prime Minister to maintain the balance between the sexes and also between so-called Leave and Remain figures in her cabinet but this is not a Government formed from a position of strength. <br> <br> Formal Brexit negotiations are due to resume later today and it would be reasonable to suppose that the EU side would press home its clear advantage. In the foreign exchange markets, the British Pound has had a wild ride over the past 24 hours. It opened in Sydney yesterday around USD1.3117 and has been as low as 1.3088 before rallying to 1.3164 as the USD itself came under pressure. <br> <br> Overall the GBP’s performance has been mixed: up against the USD, AUD and NZD but down against the EUR and CAD. Economic data in the UK on Friday are industrial production and the merchandise trade balance. We’d expect most interest to focus on the net drag on GDP from the trade deficit. Spoiler alert – it’s likely to be a bad news story.

Canadian Dollar

AUD / CAD

Expected Range

The Canadian Dollar has performed very well over the last week. It hasn’t been a one-way trade because of the volatility of incoming economic data but from an opening level of USD1.2904 on October 1st, the pair has moved down to a low of 1.2672. The CAD is also stronger against the Aussie Dollar (down from a high of 0.9908 to 0.9725) and a little less so against the Kiwi Dollar (from a high of 0.8924 to 0.8814 this morning). <br> <br> The move lower (stronger CAD) was helped by Wednesday’s better than expected numbers on housing starts which rose at an annualized pace of 222.8k against the consensus expectation of 211k and by building permits which rose 3.8% m/m versus forecasts of a more modest 1.0% m/m gain. <br> <br> Oil prices are again firmer today with Brent crude at $63.89 per barrel and NYMEX futures at $57.17. The day ahead is quiet in terms of scheduled economic data in Canada though it will be seen as a very good performance by the CAD if it can hold on to its gains of the first 10 days of this month.

Euro

AUD / EUR

Expected Range

In Europe yesterday, the European Commission released updated economic forecasts for the Eurozone economy. Back in Spring, it forecast euro area GDP growth of 1.7% in 2017 and 1.8% in 2018. These numbers have now been revised up to 2.2% and 2.1% with next year now seeing the economy growing at its fastest pace in a decade. <br> <br> European Commissioner Pierre Moscovici said, “We have entered a new phase of the economic recovery, with stronger growth driven by resilient consumption, the global upswing, loose financing conditions and falling unemployment”. Though still very high, unemployment in the euro area is expected to average 9.1% this year, its lowest level since 2009, dropping to 8.5% in 2018 and 7.9% in 2019. <br> <br> With the US Dollar under pressure and few attractive alternatives elsewhere, we said in our North American commentary that this “ought to provide a favourable backdrop for the euro today though last week’s high of USD1.1671 is still likely to keep a lid on any gains”. Well here we are with the EUR the best performing currency overnight and a high against the USD of 1.1651. Sometimes it just feels so good when a plan comes together! <br> <br> Friday looks set to be a much quieter day (unless you’re really interested in Slovakian industrial production) and we’d expect EUR/USD to stay on a USD1.16 big figure throughout the day.

New Zealand Dollar

AUD / NZD

Expected Range

Yesterday’s RBNZ meeting left the Official Cash Rate (OCR) unchanged at 1.75 percent. Its Statement noted, “The exchange rate has eased since the August Statement and, if sustained, will increase tradables inflation and promote more balanced growth... Employment growth has been strong and GDP growth is projected to strengthen, with a weaker outlook for housing and construction offset by accommodative monetary policy, the continued high terms of trade, and increased fiscal stimulus”. <br> <br> This is all pretty standard stuff and, indeed, could have been written by virtually any Central Bank in the world right now. What piqued the interest of the FX market was the RBNZ’s quarterly forecast track for its official interest rate. A quick look at this showed the Bank now sees rates rising in Q2 2019 rather than in Q3 2019 as it had previously forecast. In reality this is a tiny shift and we’re still talking 18 months away, but it was enough for the Kiwi Dollar to catch a bid immediately after the numbers were released. <br> <br> After a high of USD0.6971 in the local time zone on Thursday, it went on to a best level of 0.6975 in London. Since then, however, the currency has done little more than track the fortunes of the Aussie Dollar. AUD/NZD has been trapped in less than a 30 pip range from 1.1018-1.1045 for the whole of the past 18 hours with little or no investor interest to trade the pair ahead of today’s RBA SoMP.

United States Dollar

AUD / USD

Expected Range

The USD has had a pretty grim overnight session. In our North American opening commentary (OFX never sleeps!) we said “Its index against a basket of currencies at 94.30 has broken down below the 94.40-94.85 range… The end-October low of 94.22 and the 20-day average of 94.10 now become the immediate downside targets”. <br> <br> Well, here we are at the Sydney open and the USD Index stands at 94.17 having touched an intra-day low of 94.15. Foreign exchange is a humbling asset class and we’ll try to resist the temptation to crow about this call! The big problem for the USD hasn’t been President Trump’s Asia visit or what he did or didn’t say with Premier Xi in Beijing. Instead, it’s all about the lack of progress on tax reform in the United States, upon which so many hopes had been pinned. <br> <br> In a piece of legislative text guaranteed to make the heart sink, the House Ways and Means Committee has released the updated GOP tax bill. The very first sentence reads, “An Amendment to the Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to HR 1 Offered by Mr. Brady of Texas” and - believe your author – it doesn’t get any better from there. As we go to print the S&P 500 index is off its worst levels of the day but tax reform worries are weighing heavily on the US Dollar. We’ve warned all week here about this and thus far it is outweighing anything the President has said or done on his Asia trip.

By Nick Parsons

“Commonwealth currencies” all stronger overnight


Australian Dollar

AUD

Expected Range

There are 11 RBA Board meetings each year. Very sensibly, it takes January off, considering that people would rather be at the beach or away on vacation than be disturbed by such matters as the cost of borrowing and mortgage rates. As well as the 11 monthly Statements which essentially summarise the Board’s immediate decision on one sheet of paper, there are four Quarterly Statements of Monetary Policy (the clue is in the name!) which explain in detail the numbers and assumptions which underpin its immediate interest rate decision as well as offering a medium-term view on the economic conjecture.<br> <br> By tradition, the Board meeting is on the first Tuesday of the month with the SoMP on the Friday of the same week. After its’ warning that, “The higher exchange rate is expected to contribute to continued subdued price pressures in the economy… and is also weighing on the outlook for output and employment”, the market spent most of Tuesday selling the Australian Dollar.<br> <br> For no particularly obvious reason, it then spent most of Wednesday buying them back and at one stage reached a high of 0.7682 before closing in NY around 0.7672. For currency traders, it threatens to be a long wait until Friday…

British Pound

GBP / AUD

Expected Range

The British Pound continues to react nervously to the very fragile political situation in the UK and is by some distance the worst performing of all the major currencies overnight. Fortunately for Prime Minister Theresa May, the UK Parliament has just risen for a week’s holiday and she avoided the danger of once again coming off second-best to Opposition Leader Jeremy Corbyn in the weekly pantomime that is Prime Ministers’ Questions.<br> <br> Unfortunately, having suffered the resignation of her Defence Secretary last week, Press reports throughout the London day suggest the International Development Secretary might now be forced out after revelations about unauthorized meetings whilst on holiday in Israel. As Oscar Wilde might have put it, to lose one Minister looks unfortunate, but to lose two begins to look like carelessness...<br> <br> We wrote in our overnight commentaries for London and New York (OFX never sleeps!) that “the path of least resistance for GBP still appears to be to the downside” and this is exactly how it turned out. GBP/USD touched a low of 1.3091 after a high in Sydney yesterday of 1.3174. GBP/AUD, meantime is down 143 pips at 1.7075 whilst GBP/NZD is 142 pips lower at 1.8934.<br> <br> The day ahead for GBP will again be dominated by UK politics and the upcoming economic data – house prices and industrial production – are unlikely to offer much respite for the beleaguered pound.

Canadian Dollar

AUD / CAD

Expected Range

The Canadian Dollar enjoyed another good day on Wednesday, falling to a low against the USD of 1.2724 compared to a high the previous day of 1.2797. It was helped in this by much better than expected numbers on housing starts which rose at an annualized pace of 222.8k against the consensus expectation of 211k and by building permits which rose 3.8% m/m versus forecasts of a more modest 1.0% m/m gain. This helped the CAD keep pace with gains in the Aussie and Kiwi Dollars to end the New York session at AUD/CAD0.9770 and NZD/CAD0.8837 respectively.<br> <br> Oil prices were little changed on the day with NYMEX crude at $56.79 per barrel and natural gas futures around three-tenths of a percent higher. The day ahead is quiet in terms of scheduled economic data with only new house prices to be released and it would be a surprise indeed if the CAD was the stand-out performer in either direction over the next 24 hours.

Euro

AUD / EUR

Expected Range

Just when you thought it couldn’t get any quieter, the EUR/USD exchange rate has spent the past 24 hours trapped in a 22 pip range from 1.1586 to 1.1608 and opens in Sydney this morning at 1.1598. The technical picture continues to exert some downward pressure on the currency pair. It is now below its 20 day moving average of 1.1688, the 50 day average of 1.1782 and the 100 day measure at 1.1787.<br> <br> In another bearish chart development, the 50 day average has also crossed down through the 100 day one. In the very big picture, we should look to the much slower 200 day average for support but unfortunately this does not come into play until we get all the way down to 1.1410.<br> <br> The ECB’s Sabine Lautenschlaeger on Tuesday said, “I would have liked to see a clear exit [from QE]” and on Thursday in Europe it is the turn of Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann to speak. Analysts will again be looking for any differences of opinion between him and ECB Chief Mario Draghi. For the day ahead, there’s little in terms of Eurozone economic data (unless Lithuanian CPI and the Estonian trade balance really excite you) though at 10am GMT the European Commission will be releasing updated economic forecasts.

New Zealand Dollar

AUD / NZD

Expected Range

Just as the Aussie Dollar rose without any obvious catalyst through the European and North American sessions overnight, so too did the New Zealand Dollar. It would be a pleasure to report some insight into this price action, some hitherto unnoticed piece of news, but sadly it is just one of those occasions when we have to note what happened without fully being able to explain why. If there was a large-scale re-allocation of investment flows or a significant corporate deal to be executed, the new era of regulation in wholesale foreign exchange markets simply forbids any discussion of it.<br> <br> Indeed, it can frequently be the case that close colleagues on a major bank FX desk may have little or no knowledge of each other’s customer flows. There are obvious advantages in terms of client confidentiality, but it does mean that answering the question “why did the rate move?” is nowadays infinitely more difficult. If there are any Latin scholars amongst our readers, they may be familiar with the phrase “post hoc ergo propter hoc”. In plain English, this means “after this, therefore because of it” and it is a trap into which financial journalists often fall when attempting to ascribe causality when in fact it was just coincidence.<br> <br> The honest truth is that sometimes we just don’t – and can’t – know what moved an exchange rate. Your author is never afraid to hold his hand up and admit this; hoping to be rewarded for honesty, if not for insight! What we do know is the price action: NZD/USD has virtually tracked AUD/NZD tick for tick and the cross rate at 1.1089 is less than 10 pips away from where it closed last night. Let’s hope the RBNZ meeting today brings more obvious catalysts for market movement.

United States Dollar

AUD / USD

Expected Range

Air Force One touched down in Beijing on Wednesday to begin the third leg of President Trump’s five-nation Asia trip. In a reciprocal gesture for hosting Premier Xi at his Mar a Lago estate in Florida earlier this year, the two leaders and their wives enjoyed an opera performance and a tour of the Forbidden City.<br> <br> Your author first experienced this almost 20 years ago; a wonderful memory from back in the days when a Global FX Strategist actually got to see the world he wrote about. With the serious business part of Mr. Trump’s trip not until Thursday, the US Dollar index remains stuck in its now-familiar 94.40-94.85 range.<br> <br> It opened in London yesterday almost exactly in the middle of this band at 94.62 and simply didn’t move in North America before closing at 94.59. Of all the tools available to a current strategist or technical analyst, the most useful for analyzing the US Dollar’s movements over the last 18 hours would have been a magnifying glass. A December Fed rate hike still appears very much a done deal and it would take either a huge external shock or a sudden sharp decline in the stock market to make investors rethink their views. Keep an eye on tax reform progress back home, as well as the President’s Asia trip and his Twitter feed for near-term clues on the USD.

By Nick Parsons

AUD rate hike hopes not rekindled


Australian Dollar

AUD

Expected Range

Rekindling, ridden by Corey Brown, burst down the home straight at Flemington Racecourse on Tuesday to be only the second Irish horse in 24 years to win the Melbourne Cup. For the Reserve Bank of Australia, however, interest rate expectations were most certainly not ‘rekindled’. Its Statement yesterday noted, “forecasts for growth in the Australian economy are largely unchanged… The higher exchange rate is expected to contribute to continued subdued price pressures in the economy. It is also weighing on the outlook for output and employment. An appreciating exchange rate would be expected to result in a slower pick-up in economic activity and inflation than currently forecast.” <br> <br> The RBA reiterated its forecast for GDP growth to pick up and to average around 3 per cent over the next few years but currency markets were not slow to take the hint and marked down the AUD exchange rate.<br> <br> AUD/USD has been on a one-way path lower over the last 24 hours; falling from 0.7690 at yesterday’s Sydney open to a low in London of 0.7628 before a very modest 10 pip rally into the New York close. With no domestic economic data scheduled Wednesday, any move off a US 76 cent handle is more likely to be to the downside than back up on to the 77 cents seen briefly last Thursday.

British Pound

GBP / AUD

Expected Range

The British Pound fell for almost the whole of Tuesday’s London trading session, weighed down by soft retail sales data from the BRC and further reflection on the very poor car sales numbers which we highlighted earlier in the week. In another sign that shoppers are cutting back, sales at John Lewis’s department stores fell by 3.7% last week compared to a year earlier. Revenues in the seven days to 4th November fell to £102.03m, from £105.98m in 2016. Homeware sales shank by 7% and electrical and home technology takings tumbled by 8.4% despite the iPhone X launch boosting mobile phone sales.<br> <br> GBP/USD reached a low point of 1.3111 before rallying around 40 pips during the New York afternoon to end the day only modestly lower than it had begun. Against the Australian Dollar, the GBP fared much better, reaching a high in New York of 1.7225; a level not seen since last Thursday.<br> <br> As the so-called ‘Paradise Papers’ continue to cast the UK in an unfavourable light over its stance on tax-havens, it is perhaps fortunate for Prime Minister Theresa May that the UK Parliament has just risen for a week’s holiday. This won’t keep politics out of the newspapers, but she avoids the danger of once again coming off second-best to Opposition Leader Jeremy Corbyn in the weekly pantomime that is Prime Ministers’ Questions. Whether the GBP can similarly breathe a sigh of relief remains to be seen…

Canadian Dollar

AUD / CAD

Expected Range

Bank of Canada Governor Stephen Poloz is one of the more interesting and insightful Central Bank Governors around. Though we [only half] jokingly suggested that the best way to forecast inflation in the short-term is to drive past a gasoline station and look at the price on the pump, his speech yesterday evening to the Montreal Council on Foreign Relations was a more scholarly affair.<br> <br> Mr Poloz concluded a fascinating speech by noting, “The popular perception that inflation has become inexplicable has been greatly exaggerated. In part, this perception reflects a misunderstanding of the accuracy with which economists can predict inflation, and a misunderstanding of the precision with which central banks can control it. Fundamentally, we know how inflation works - the laws of supply and demand have not been repealed… The bottom line is that inflation targeting has worked, through good times and bad, for more than 25 years. It continues to work today”.<br> <br> Currency traders will have been a bit disappointed there were no clear signals for the CAD in the speech though USD/CAD did come off its highs of the day to end around 1.2780 with AUD/CAD little changed over the past 24 hours at 0.9768. Canadian gasoline, meantime, Mr. Poloz, is C$1.36 per litre…

Euro

AUD / EUR

Expected Range

It’s recently been quite a rare sight for German economic data to fall short of consensus expectations but that’s exactly what happened Tuesday. After a 2.6% m/m jump in August, industrial production fell -1.6% in September compared to forecasts of a more modest - 0.9% m/m decline. EUR/USD had briefly dipped on to a 1.15 big figure overnight in Asia but then after the economic numbers, it took out the overnight low of 1.1584 to move down to a low of 1.1557; its weakest in almost 10 days.<br> <br> The ECB’s Sabine Lautenschlaeger told Bloomberg TV, “We have a strong growth momentum, we have growth for 17 quarters and now the labour market has a solid recovery, the sentiment factors are positive, the financial conditions for firms and households are very favourable so I’m very confident that the inflation rate will pick up. I think it was correct to reduce the amount [of QE assets] purchased from January onwards. I would have liked to see a clear exit”.<br> <br> Draghi’s speech in Frankfurt was about banking supervision rather than monetary policy and he was unsurprisingly quite upbeat about progress made since the financial crisis. During the North American session, the EUR managed to claw back around 30 pips against the USD to 1.1587 but still sits below its 20, 50 and 100 day moving averages. Major support from the 200dma is not seen until 1.1410.

New Zealand Dollar

AUD / NZD

Expected Range

The 52nd Parliament in New Zealand was formally opened on Tuesday in Wellington. Today, another ceremony - the state opening of Parliament - will take place. The Governor General will attend this ceremony and deliver a Speech from the throne which sets out the Government's priorities for the term.<br> <br> As promised during the election campaign, Finance Minister Grant Robertson has launched a review of the Central Bank’s mandate to include maximizing employment as a monetary policy goal. However, he said there was no plan to include the New Zealand dollar, the world’s 11th most traded currency, in the bank’s revised mandate. Mr Robertson also said he did not expect the proposed alterations to have any immediate impact on monetary policy, but acknowledged that in a situation of high unemployment and slightly higher inflation, rates could be lowered though, “My view is that this shouldn’t have a dramatic impact, certainly in the near-term”.<br> <br> Whilst the FX market was busy selling Aussie Dollars over the past 18 hours, its Kiwi counterpart held pretty steady against the USD; moving only between 0.6888 and 0.6940. This combination at one point pressured the AUD/NZD cross down to 1.1057; its lowest point in almost three weeks before a very slight recovery in the last hour of NY trading. For local FX markets, however, the next key event is still Thursday’s RBNZ meeting.

United States Dollar

AUD / USD

Expected Range

As Mr Trump moved on from Japan to South Korea, he spoke at a joint press conference with President Moon Jae-in on Tuesday after private meetings in which the two leaders reaffirmed their nations’ “ironclad” alliance. Mr. Trump said he would not allow Pyongyang to threaten South Korea’s safety and that Mr Kim was “threatening millions and millions of lives so needlessly”. Though he stressed that the US had immense military capabilities, Mr Trump said, “we hope to God we don’t have to use military force”.<br> <br> With the euro sliding back (see below) the USD index at one point yesterday moved up to 94.85; its best level since last Friday before slipping back to close in New York around 94.66.<br> <br> In economic data, the number of job openings in the US rose slightly in September to 6.09 million, keeping them near a record high. Job openings have now topped 6 million for four months in a row for the first time ever. A December rate hike appears very much a done deal (the CME online calculator pins the probability of a 25bp rise at 93%) and it would take either a huge external shock or a sudden sharp decline in the stock market to make investors rethink their views. Keep an eye on tax reform progress, though, for near-term clues on the USD.

By Nick Parsons

RBA and Melbourne Cup day


Australian Dollar

AUD

Expected Range

As the US Dollar turned lower during the New York afternoon, so the AUD was able to regain some of the ground it lost last week, even though with a high of 0.7681 it still wasn’t able to claw its way on to a US 77 cents handle.<br> <br> It’s been interesting to watch local analysts who wrongly forecast an increase in retail sales blaming their error on the late release of the iPhone X but it is hard to believe the central bank will spend sleepless nights worrying whether the latest smartphone warrants a change in monetary policy. It’s only a short stroll from the RBA head office in Martin Place down to the Apple store on George Street if they really want to check out how busy it is!<br> <br> More regular economic data scheduled for this morning is the AiG performance of Construction index for October and the weekly Roy Morgan consumer confidence index, though no published consensus is available for either of the two data points. Despite the slightly better performance of AUD/USD in New York, the key AUD/NZD cross edged lower throughout the session and is once again back on a 1.10 big figure. Recall that a couple of weeks ago it was as high as 1.1280…<br>

British Pound

GBP / AUD

Expected Range

UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s Conservative Government, which now relies on Ulster’s Democratic Unionist Party to keep it in office, is currently engulfed (along with its Labour Party Opposition) by scandals involving allegations of improper sexual conduct dating back over many years. There was a palpable sign of relief in London on Monday morning that there had been no further revelations or resignations over the weekend and having held in a very tight range between 1.3063 and 1.3078 during the Asian session, GBP/USD was able to press ahead to a best level in New York of 1.3168 with GBP/AUD reaching a high of 1.7142.<br> <br> The bigger picture for the UK economy, though, still seems to be one of weakness. Latest figures released Monday morning showed total car sales in the UK are down 12.9% y/y; the seventh consecutive month in which fewer cars were sold relative to the same month a year ago. For the first 10 months of 2017, a total of 2,224,603 vehicles were sold compared with 2,330,663 in the same period in 2016. Along with house prices, nothing quite shows consumer confidence as clearly as shiny new cars on the driveway. A double-digit y/y decline is a vivid illustration of the current fragile state of the UK economy.

Canadian Dollar

AUD / CAD

Expected Range

The Canadian Dollar yesterday extended the gains it made at the back end of last week, and benefitted in particular from a weaker USD later in the day. Having closed on Friday at USD/CAD1.2762, it printed down at a low of 1.2718 during the New York afternoon.<br> <br> The weekly data published by the CFTC show that investors have been running net long Canadian dollar positions since the beginning of May. So-called ‘speculative longs’ peaked at 98,079 contracts in the week of October 10th and the latest numbers published over the weekend show they have only been very gradually scaled back to 72,097 contracts. Investors are clearly rattled by the sharp slowdown in the Canadian economy since the BoC’s two surprise interest rate hikes, but these concerns have been offset somewhat by firmer oil prices which are a benefit to its shale oil producers.<br> <br> NYMEX crude yesterday rose 2.8% to $57.24 per barrel whilst natural gas futures were over 4% higher. BoC Governor Stephen Poloz is scheduled to give a speech Tuesday on “Central Banks’ ability to understand inflation”. We’d humbly suggest the easiest way right now is to drive past a gas station and look at the price on the pumps.

Euro

AUD / EUR

Expected Range

The euro’s remarkable run of being stuck on a USD 1.16 handle finally came to an end in London trading Monday morning, with a low of 1.1594 seen before the EUR bounced back on PMI services data which showed the pace of job creation at its fastest pace in a decade. The New York session saw it slip further to a low of 1.1583 before nervousness around the prospects for US tax reform pulled the rug from under the US Dollar later in the NY afternoon. Nevertheless, the EUR could not get any higher than 1.1613 and struggled on all its major crosses to be the worst performing currency on the day.<br> <br> Looking forward, there’s not much more economic data to be released. ECB speakers include Draghi, Lautenschlaeger, Nuoy, and Angeloni on Tuesday whilst it’s the turn of Bank of France Governor de Galhau and Bundesbank President Weidmann on Thursday.<br> <br> Often these speeches are used to ‘reset’ perceptions of policy and to help correct any unwelcome post-ECB movements in foreign exchange and interest rate markets. The German Bundesbank, as usual, is likely to be the most “hawkish” of the speakers but we’d expect an otherwise fairly relaxed commentary which might not give the EUR much near-term support.

New Zealand Dollar

AUD / NZD

Expected Range

The New Zealand Dollar was knocked back yesterday by the RBNZ’s latest survey of inflation expectations. Whilst year-ahead inflation expectations rose from 1.77% to 1.87%, the more closely-watched 2-year expectations (which align more closely with the RBNZ’s mandate) fell from 2.09% to 2.02%. These figures are quite important given that on Thursday is the RBNZ meeting when we’ll get updated forecasts on interest rates and CPI.<br> <br> In Monday’s Asian session, the New Zealand Dollar was at the bottom of the pile with NZD/USD slipping from an opening level around 0.6910 to a low of 0.6876. It recovered through London trading on to a 69 cents handle and as the USD began to slip in New York, it has been able to push on to a best level of 0.6924.<br> <br> The Crown Financial Accounts published this morning will be interesting as, along with last week’s employment numbers, they show the economic starting point for the new Labour administration. For currency markets, however, the key event is still Thursday’s RBNZ meeting.

United States Dollar

AUD / USD

Expected Range

President Trump is now three days into his ten day, five country, economic and foreign policy trip to Asia and thus far it has passed without much controversy. His first meetings were with fellow golfer Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and public comments after their 9-holes focused on issues of trade between the two nations. The US has urged Japan to buy more American military equipment and build more cars in the United States whilst the Japanese side countered that 75% of its cars sold in the US are already manufactured there.<br> <br> The US Dollar index against a basket of currencies held firm though Monday’s Asian and European sessions but then lost a quarter of a percentage point through the North American day to a low of 94.47 from 94.78.<br> <br> We warned here yesterday that “as President Trump continues his Asia trip with visits to China and South Korea later in the week, it will be important to keep an eye on what the Republican Party are doing back home. Any signs of squabbling and delay on tax cuts will keep a lid on further USD strength”. With House Ways and Means Chairman Kevin Brady telling his panel that it faces a “monumental challenge” this week, investors duly reacting by marking down the USD even as stock markets continue to rally. There’s no major US economic data scheduled for Tuesday so it’s once again all about Trump and taxes.

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